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Printing History 21 on Press

Front and back cover of Printing History 21. (Michael Russem)

Here’s a peek at Printing History 21, the first issue produced by the team of Brooke Palmieri, editor; Michael Russem, publication designer; and Katherine Ruffin, Vice-President for Publications. 

The contents include an interview with Kseniya Thomas; the articles “Leonard Jay: A Pioneer of Printing Education” by Caroline Archer-Parré; “The Merrymount Janson Type and Matrices” by John Kristensen; and “The Electric Typesetter: The Origins of Computing in Typography” by John Labovitz. Book Reviews: Claire M. Bolton, The Fifteenth-Century Printing Practices of Johann Zainer, Ulm, 1473–1478; Ellen Mazur Thomson, Aesthetic Tracts: Innovation in Late-Nineteenth-Century Book Design; Richard-Gabriel Rummonds, Fantasies and Hard Knocks: My Life as a Printer; and Richard Kegler, The Aries Press of Eden, New York.

Printing History 21 was printed at PuritanCapital in Hollis, New Hampshire. The cover, shown here, was printed on a 14 × 20″ Heidelberg GTO, 5/c. The text was printed on a 40″ Komori S40, 6c. The stock is Mohawk Superfine Softwhite—the paper we’ve used since issue No. 1.

APHA members will receive their copies in the mail mid-month. 

Comments

  1. I am a fan of of print, and the first two magazines I received (for signing up in 2016) were well made. Articles were good as well. It is a pleasure to me to handle well printed and well bound print. Thanks.

  2. Paul Moxon, Website Editor 9 February, 2017 at 2:11 pm

    Welcome aboard, Sean. This is the beginning of an exciting new era for the journal.

  3. Stephen R. Whittaker 10 February, 2017 at 11:09 am

    Looks like another treasure for our collections!

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